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FBL - Functional Kinetics

The functional kinetics (FBL) - Functional Kinetics (FK) was developed by Dr. hc S. Klein-Vogelbach (1909-1996) . In Switzerland, the FBL / FK is an integral part of the basic training and is therefore part of the basic knowledge of most physiotherapists.

FBL is - as the name suggests - primarily a movement theory that serves to analyze, name and instruct movements of all kinds. The concept is unique and unrivaled. There is nothing better.

The FBL / FK was written down in various textbooks, the latest editions of which are shown.

Recently, these classics have been supplemented by subject-specific books, all of which were written by long-time students of Ms. S. Klein-Vogelbach.

Further information is available on the association's website

(click on logo)

Based on the concept of functional movement theory, Ms. Klein-Vogelbach developed therapeutic exercises that offer individual and specific solutions for a wide variety of questions and problems.

In addition to exercises without equipment, under the name of ball gymnastics, functional kinetics, exercises were developed that specifically use the physical properties of the ball to make movement tasks more difficult and to optimize them.

These exercises have become legendary and are among the best exercises out there because they are based on normal human movement. So they are many times more differentiated than the outdated exercises of the Pilates concept (see Pilates - why?) .

Since the precise learning of the respective exercises is very demanding, this requires professional training.

Another application of functional kinetics is the analysis and training of normal walking . This movement, too, must be fully understood so that useful therapeutic conclusions can be drawn from it.

Ms. Klein-Vogelbach has defined specific observation criteria that can be used to assess the functionality of walking. This knowledge was documented in her book Gait Training for Functional Movement Theory, which appeared in 1995.

As a supplement to the movement therapeutic applications of functional movement theory, Ms. Klein-Vogelbach has developed three essential treatment techniques, which are also unique in terms of their conception. They are called

stroke-free mobilization /

counteracting mobilization and

mobilizing massage

designated.

What all techniques have in common is that they are not purely passive applications , but that the patient's sense of movement can be trained at the same time, making it easier to transfer them to other movements.

Examples of these techniques are shown below.

The following interview “Biography and Knowledge” from 1986 gives an insight into the career of Ms. Klein-Vogelbach.

The interview begins with the statement that

… Life takes place more and more in artificial circumstances, which overstrains the body. He shows through pain that we are treating him wrongly. The Basel physiotherapist Susanne Klein-Vogelbach sees her job as much more than a kind of repair workshop for injured parties . "

The interview ends with Ms. Klein-Vogelbach's answer to the question “ What do you think of the newer tendencies to limit science to measurements ”:

You can't convey a movement through a computer. I can only convey a movement if I have consciously experienced it myself with my body. It doesn't help if I pass on any data, I have to convey a feeling ”.

An early article from 1963! explains the principle of active abutment formation. It is one of the most important principles for stabilizing the spine.

The following video shows the fine art of conveying movement using the abdominal muscle training demonstrated by Ms. Dr. Klein-Vogelbach.

(copyright by Springer Verlag)

FBL/FK - Widerlagernde Mobilisation

FBL/FK - Widerlagernde Mobilisation

FBL/FK - Widerlagernde Mobilisation
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Prinzip der Widerlagernden Mobilisation beim Rotationstyp

Prinzip der Widerlagernden Mobilisation beim Rotationstyp

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Widerlagernde Mobilisation des Schultergelenkes in Abduktion/Adduktion

Widerlagernde Mobilisation des Schultergelenkes in Abduktion/Adduktion

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Widerlagernde Mobilisation des Hüftgelenkes in Extension

Widerlagernde Mobilisation des Hüftgelenkes in Extension

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